Gluten Ingredient List

by admin on May 20, 2011

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Here is a very interesting list of ingredients for personal care products that can be glutenous. I found this on one of the message boards. Some of the ingredients were smooshed up next to each other, so I hope that I have separated them correctly! I did also add “barley lipids” (found that from one company), and vitamin E derived from wheat germ oil (found that from several sources).

If you are aware of a correction to this list or an addition, please drop me a note. I am no chemist, just a consumer like all of you! :) I am not certain of the source of this list, though I will probably pursue that so that I can get a more complete/updated list. Very handy to have in case you need to double check something. I will also continue to check into any other potentially hidden source of gluten that I can learn about regarding ingredients.

BARLEY DERIVED INGREDIENTS
SAMINO PEPTIDE COMPLEX
BARLEY EXTRACT
HORDEUM VULGARE (BARLEY) EXTRACT
PHYTOSPHINGOSINE EXTRACT
BARLEY LIPIDS

WHEAT DERIVED INGREDIENTS
AMP-ISOSTEAROYL HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN
DISODIUM WHEATGERMAMIDO PEG-2 SULFOSUCCINATE
HYDROLYZED WHEAT GLUTEN
HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN
HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN PG-PROPYL SILANETRIOL
HYDROLYZED WHEAT STARCH
HYDROXYPROPYLTRIMONIUM HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN

STEARYLDIMONIUMHYDROXYPROPYL
HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN
WHEAT AMINO ACIDS
WHEAT BRAN EXTRACT
WHEAT GERM EXTRACT
WHEAT GERM GLYCERIDES
WHEAT GERM OIL
WHEAT GERMAMIDOPROPYLDIMONIUM HYDROXYPROPYL
WHEAT (TRITICUM VULGARE) BRAN EXTRACT
TRITICUM VULGARE (WHEAT) FLOUR LIPIDS
TRITICUM VULGARE (WHEAT) GERM EXTRACT
TRITICUM VULGARE (WHEAT) GERM OIL
VITAMIN E DERIVED FROM WHEAT GERM OIL

OAT DERIVED INGREDIENTS
SAVENA SATIVA (OAT) FLOUR
AVENA SATIVA (OAT) KERNEL PROTEIN
OAT (AVENA SATIVA) EXTRACT
OAT BETA GLUCANOAT EXTRACT
OAT FLOURSODIUM LAUROYL
OAT AMINO ACIDS

Hope this helps in your quest for gluten-safe choices.

{ 10 comments… read them below or add one }

Deanne July 18, 2011 at 11:18 pm

Why oats? I thought oatmeal was fine to eat, so why would oat be okay in cosmetics?

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admin July 19, 2011 at 12:13 am

Hi Deanne. Nearly all oats are contaminated with gluten because of how they are processed (close proximity to wheat). Only certified gluten free oats would be truly acceptable for a person needing to avoid gluten, and those aren’t usually used in cosmetics. If you aim to eliminate all exposure to gluten, it’s important to look for oats in everything. Thanks for the question.

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Bewildered Bug November 15, 2011 at 2:49 pm

Hi Deanne, I also wanted to add that I am gluten intolerant and I thought that the supposed “gluten free” oats would be safe. I used to eat Glutenfreda instant oatmeals (so convenient for a gf breakfast!) but was getting really bad cramps and burning in the mornings at work. After speaking with a few other gf people on forums etc, I found out that even though they say they are gf, Glutenfreda oats aren’t really and a lot of people have problems.

Sometimes it’s just better to just avoid the oats altogether….there’s no guarantee that they’re gluten free (due to contamination from other grains). Also some people react to soy. I’ve been getting the burning again from something else that I’m eating – I’m thinking it’s the Glutino products I’ve recently added in .

In the end I think you really have to be careful – cause even some “gluten free” goods have a level of gluten in them.

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admin November 15, 2011 at 3:05 pm

Thanks Bewildered Bug. I believe it really matters whether something is “certified” with tests and such or if it’s gluten free by ingredient but not in a dedicated facility. If there’s one thing I’ve learned with all this, the term “gluten free” does not quite mean the same thing across all products!

My husband has occasionally had digestive upset that we haven’t been able to identify. We aren’t certain that it has anything to do with gluten, because we check and he’s pretty specific about what he eats. Wonders if it could be the amount of fat in certain recipes, could be a completely different ingredient that you didn’t know you had a sensitivity to (soy, corn, or something like that), or something completely unrelated to diet. A reminder about how it can be so difficult to even identify celiac disease!

But to get back to the oats, some people with gluten sensitivities just avoid oats (even GF ones) just because there can be reactions. It’s not completely understood why, even when the tests say the gluten levels are acceptable. So it’s up to you and your body seems to react. Safe oats will be your best bet, but try them with a watchful eye.

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Susan Gomez June 16, 2012 at 2:59 pm

Hi I realize this is an old date, as today is June 16 2012, but I have found I get digestive upset with ALL wheat derived chemicals too such as maltodextrin, dextrin, and dextrose. I read some where that maltodextrin was safe for celiacs, and maybe it is, as I am wheat intolerant.

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katya September 28, 2011 at 4:12 pm

i realize that wheat-derived xanthan gum would fall under wheat derivatives, but i think it’s important to put it up specifically since it’s in so much now. i just found out about that one a little while ago. :/

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Susanne Devich November 20, 2011 at 8:55 pm

I have used arrowhead gluten free oats without any reaction. The other brand you mentioned about a week ago, processes the oats on equipment which has processed potato starch. I am also allergic to potatoes, tomatoes and peppers, which is a night shade allergy…can make the bottom of your feet sting. It isn’t unusual for people with celiac to have other allergies as well, and sometimes it is difficult to know which allergy the body is reacting to.

Susanne

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admin November 20, 2011 at 9:47 pm

Thanks for your helpful comment. Yes, some people with gluten issues do have other dietary concerns. It’s so unique for everyone, so it’s important to check everything you need to.

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Joyanne April 22, 2012 at 3:18 pm

just getting rid of some products I’m not using and have used for awhile and checking the lists, one of the heat protectant has tocopheryl Acetate (vitamin E) in it. Just looked it up and it can be derived from wheat, sometimes other safe sources. If it is in a product you like you will have to call the company to find out exactly where it came from. thanks for this great post.

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Eugenia Rodgers July 30, 2012 at 2:48 pm

I have horrible leg pains when I eat gluten. Syptoms are suggetive of Shin Splints but nothing helps or works except GF eating. I also develop knots behind the knees and in the groin areas. No gluten equals no pain and no knots. Any ideas?

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